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20130106
20130114
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
is low. daphne koller, a computer science professor at stanford, is one of coursera's founders. >> i think by opening up education for free to everyone around the world, they're going to turn education, high-quality education, from a privilege to a basic human right, so that anyone, no matter their social, economic or family circumstances, has access to the best education. >> reporter: those lofty goals-- the experience of teaching thousands of students and the possibility of future profits-- are what got these courses going. professors from top universities are signing up, even though they are not paid by the providers. eventually, universities may share revenues they receive-- when there are revenues-- with the professors. and those star professors have inspired intense student interest in the courses, says coursera's other co-founder, andrew ng. >> most people today will never have access to a princeton, stanford, cal tech class. but now, if you wake up tomorrow morning and you decide you want to take a cal tech class, you can. you can just sign up for one, and it's free. >> repor
, celeste ward gventer, thank you. >> thank you so much, judy. >> thank you. >> brown: next, a science and medical story involving research from the frontiers of robotics. ray suarez looks at how doctors are using high tech toys to help people with special needs. >> what's your favorite game? >> "mario cart," the original. >> reporter: in a carefully monitored session that seems more like playtime than therapy, researchers at the university of notre dame have enlisted an unusual therapist to assist their studies of children with autism, a two foot robot named kelly. >> i got to skip school today, because of you guys. >> that is so cool. i am so glad. >> reporter: kelly is working with 11 year old liam mcguire and a co-therapist of the human kind, kristen wier. >> for liam, kelly has become a friend. i mean, he's very excited to see her. you can tell, he lights up when he sees kelly, he leans forward, his posture changes, his eye contact is much stronger. i think it's something he can relate to, and feel successful with. >> i like to play soccer. >> reporter: robots, like this one are b
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: as unemployment, growth and budget concerns continue, the man who will lead president obama's new economic team was formally nominated today. the announcement came this afternoon, the latest in a series of major cabinet changes. >> one reason jack has been so effective in this town is because he is a low-key guy who prefers to surround himself with policy experts rather than t.v. cameras. >> brown: with that, the president introduced his nominee to be the next secretary of the treasury, jack lew, the man he made his chief of staff, a year ago yesterday. lew would succeed tim geithner, who drew fulsome praise from the president. >> when the history books are written tim geithner's going to go down as one o
is a big deal. getting the kids in school today studying the sciences and technology and engineering and the math to stay in this country and getting a path to his citizenship and dealing with the competencies' to grow jobs. if you can deal with those issues, we would be off to a great start. >> you have many of your clients in the manufacturing business. looking at the broader economic shift, what do you do in a post- manufacturing world to provide the numbers of jobs that america needs? because it does not appear clear yet. >> we have roughly 12 million jobs through the great recession lost. we have filled about half of those. it will still take some more between five-seven years to get unemployment down to the 5% range. and you are right, the skill sets are starting to move. it will have to be able to move with that prepared the first that -- we will have to be able to move with that. the first up is immigration reform and job training. >> you are a guide in ohio and you have lost your job at a car plant and you are 55 years old. immigration reform will not help you much, is it? >
. there was an outcry provoked by this horrific crime. in a new delhi suburb, science of how slow change may be. the authorities and their attitudes -- signs of how slow change may be. another woman was found dead after a suspected gang rape. she was going home from her job at a factory. when her father reported her missing, police did not listen. >> they were rude and said she had probably gone off with a man. do not worry, she will come back. >> another family grieving now. many ask if things will really change it when the ander dies down -- anger dies down. >> there is a heavy police presence in belfast after violent protests involving children as young as 10. the disturbance was sparked by the decision to limit the number of days the union flag flies over city hall. dozens of police officers have been injured. our correspondent has sent us the latest. >> the main route through east belfast looks like a battleground. pilots for the fifth consecutive night. -- riots for the fifth consecutive night. the protest target five weeks ago. there is no end in sight. political leaders are well aware o
line that is -- has filled, science fiction novels. there's more to the script. there are 17 billion planets similar to earth in our galaxy. could the similarities mean that any of those could support life? a short time ago i discussed that with theoretical physicist michio kaku. >> this is a game changer. one out of six stars that you see a night could have an earth- like planet going around it. somebody could be looking back at us from our space. >> what are the chances that they are? some of these planets circulating might have the possibility of supporting life? >> to be fair, most of the earth-size planets probably have no more than microbial life like germs and seaweed. a few of them might have intelligent life. dna has been around for about $3.50 -- 3.5 billion years. only in the last five runners thousand years as intelligent life risen out of this one. you cannot rule out intelligent life. quex in 2011, astronomers said they had found two earth sized planets. now it is billions. >> they have taken a census of the milky way galaxy. 50% of all stars have some kind of planet go
, we want you to tell us what you think of our science coverage in a new poll. find both at "lunch in the lab." jeff brown talks to "washington post" film critic ann hornaday about the surprises and shutouts in this year's oscar nominations. and we profile an entrepreneur who built a web site for citizens to report and get responses to problems in their community. all that and more is on our web site, newshour.pbs.org. judy. >> woodruff: and that's the newshour for tonight. on monday, we'll look at the lifting of travel restrictions for cubans some 50 years after fidel castro put them in place. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. "washington week" can be seen later this evening on most pbs stations. we'll see you online, and again here monday evening. have a nice weekend. thanks for joining us. good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to
. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: today's announcement at the white house sets up a pair of potential confirmation fights. president obama's choices to oversee the pentagon and the c.i.a. will now be called to answer questions about everything from israel to iran to interrogations. there has been much speculation about both nominations, but the president made them official this afternoon in the east room of the white house. >> my choice for two key members of my national security team. chuck hagel, former secretary of defense and john brennan for director of the central intelligence agency. >> woodruff: hagel is a vietnam veteran who would replace the retiring leon panetta. he would be the first defense secretary who saw combat as an enlisted soldie
along. >> these are science kits. by the time i got onto the second floor, i thought i was going to throw up. it was glue and scissors and composition books. things that teachers not only are dying for, but spend their own money on. and they'd been sitting there for years. there are boxes and boxes of these things here. >> rhee's warehouse tour made the evening news, and put central office bureaucrats on notice. >> if you have people who aren't producing, start documenting. make sure on his performance evaluation that you are clear on that. so you just have to, department by department, just be as on top of it as you possibly can. the central office has to be oriented in the right way. we don't run the schools. we serve the schools. right now, people at the central office have this idea that they are in charge and, you know, they can grant requests, they can give information if they feel like it, and if not... that's the absolutely wrong way to think about things. right now we don't have good quality controls in place. what's going to solve the problem is creating a culture of ac
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)